Tag Archives: West Oakland

Family Reunion: Coleman / Culverson, SoCAL recap.

Southern California-– I am a double Family descendant belonging to the Coleman and the Culversons on my maternal side and at the helm hails my 90 year old Grandmother Elsie Waters, daughter of Mabel Coleman and Cleveland Culverson of West Carroll Parish, Louisiana.  My Grandmother along with my Grandfather married as “Waters” although they had known each other since my Grandmother was 13 years old. They moved to West Oakland, California at the end of WWII and bought their 1st piece of property on Campbell Street.

Coleman / Culverson Family Reunion - Southern California 2015

Our Southern California Colemans and Culversons were the host for this year’s Family Reunion. I was absolutely thrilled to be in attendance, to share my love for Family History at the same time to speak with Elders who would know the story beneath the story of the many living Elders and their descendants and of our celebrated Patriarch, Perry Coleman. Tis a major feat to bridge the convening of these double cousins, yet Coleman and Culverson Families have organized reunion for nearly 17 years. I am fortunate to have been a part of the Northern California branch to launch its first Family History pamphlets and books in 1993, inspired by my Grandfather Claude Waters Jr, these efforts forwarded to this day by my Grandmother Elsie Waters – Today there are 5 pieces of self-produced booklets, with another project underway.

Coleman & Culverson Family Reunion pix 

[upper lft] Family Matriarchs

[upper rt] Taking notes in consultation with Family Elders at the table.

Coleman/Culverson Family Reunion -Southern California 2015

[btm left] Bakersfield 2017 Family Reunion Announcement by Cousins O.C. and Odella Johnson

[btm right] In the grand scheme of things, nothing else matters but the love and compassion that we show to one another.  ~Pastor J. R. Coleman The Word Community Church, Fresno, CA

 

#Dancestory2015
          Coleman Family Church – Los Angeles branch            St. Reed Missionary Baptist Church

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#Coleman Family Mothers convene to say “Farewell” until next…Cousin Jimmi Coleman, Matriarch Elsie Waters [front] daughters [upper] Katie Waters, Selyah Waters & my Mom Patricia Calloway along with cousin Deidre Coleman, wife of our cousin Duane aka Pastor J.R. Coleman.
Cousin kinship

Cousins strengthening Family ties. Cousin Rashad, my Brother Jon & me ;) All from James Gabriel Coleman line.
Cousins binding Family ties. Cousin Rashad, my Brother Jon &  Me. *James Gabriel Coleman line
Cousin Chara - key organizer of this year's Reunion ever so thankful for her assistance in assuring my participation
Cousin Chara – key organizer of this year’s Reunion.  A BIG thanks of gratitude to you cousin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

            #nzoCALIFAncestry

Coleman Family Patriarch Born 1879 Tuskola, AL
        Coleman Family Patriarch, Perry Coleman
Born 1879 Tuskola, AL   Died 1947 Epps, West Carroll Parish, Louisiana

#AncestorSeason: My Ancestral Guardianship – Claude Waters, Jr

I woke up this morning in a comfortable embryo position, finding my tear ducts filled, with a soft weep at its brink, eased by a smile and a deep longing for that solid presence, and in consolation knowing that HE is still here and with me. It is my STUFF, us grand kids called him, born Claude Waters, Jr of Junction City, Louisiana in 1926 to Freadie Roe and Claude Waters, Sr.

Driving a tractor at the age 14, and taking care of his parents since he was a teen, my grandfather was quite accustomed to working with his hands and tilling the earth. Extremely resourceful in his community and among family, he was a quiet guided Spirit, and the life of  a party, yet firm in his vision and could easily galvanize his resources in people and through his work ethic to make things happen. Then, although he was met with a hesitancy by his childhood friend and his first love about the idea of getting married, he patiently awaited and kept it moving and soon after, the two would reunite in California where Claude and Elsie came to be, raised a family of 5 and took care of his Mother in West Oakland.

Ancestral Guardianship: My Maternal Grandfather hailing from Junction City, Louisiana. iba’e, iba’e tonnu

Their first home was on Campbell St. and Willow Manor was the local school his children attended, he worked for the Owens Illinois Glass Company, served 2 years for the United States Armed forces, later working at the Oakland Army Base in materials handling as an equipment operator.  After furthering his education at Merritt College he worked professionally for the State of California in Landscaping and Highway Maintenance for 26 years, availing the Family home we know today in East Oakland, they were the first Black Family on the block as his children attended Fremont Highschool and Castlemont Highschool. Maybe around 2003, I was bestowed with a rare opportunity to revisit my grandparents’ first digs on Campbell Street, as it was then owned by enterprising West Oakland aspiring “Black moguls” who had acquired this real estate; Through a close friend, I’d also learn that a New Orleans couple that I knew, were slated to purchase it and so I arranged access for me take a tour. By cell phone, my Mom guided me through each room, vividly depicting who stayed where, including her grandmother “Sug” in the “mother-in-law” room. When I told my grandmother of this, we were all pretty excited about the couple purchasing the home as they were still in escrow, yet my Grandmother mindfully warned – get the keys!

When my grandfather passed in January 1997, it was like the spoke of a wheel lifted, leaving the wheel  to topple over trying to balance – Family. He being a 25 member of the Masons, with membership to Monarch Lodge #73, Menelik Temple #36 and the Victoria Consistory, he was also the President of the Scimitar Club for 2 years. He was that pillar and visionary who surpassed risks, didn’t accept “I can’t” and firmly encouraged our productivity, progressive action and no nonsense; he still was a lot of fun and laughs and could out run ALL of his track star grandchildren in jeans, with his house slippers on and a cigarette in his mouth. *smh* My grandmother called him a  “risk-taker” for which we are all grateful to him for this day, as we are STILL property owners in Oakland.

Today, I ponder at the fact that I wouldn’t have taken up such a dedicated interest in Geneaology research, if it weren’t for the positive encouragement of my Grandfather. I have upon many attempts worked to crack “the mystery” surrounding his Father’s people. I’ve gotten the lore of half-sisters one day, estranged family members asking for money another day, yet NO INFO even though there’s a wealth of technological access today in Genealogical research. The #AncestorChallenge attached below was the result of a task placed before members of the The African American Genealogy & Slave Ancestry Research (AAGSAR) led by #Genealogy buff Ms. Luckie Daniels, as she was most definitely a welcomed catalyst, with an adjoined “No Brick Walls” policy. Tenaciously, I did learn from his draft registration card, that my great grandfather Claude Waters, Sr was married prior to our Sug, and the next of kin listed on the card was a “Raiford” “Rayford”; in subsequent searches there’d be an absence of any information between the 1920’s and 1930’s, although I located residence info cited in the 1930 census. Been poking in and around neighbor surnames on Census records as well, and even super-sleuthing information surrounding my great grandfather’s first wife Daisy Rose-Waters her 2nd husband and son , with no avail to any additional information  yet.

gene_Case scenario in search of my Paternal Great Grand Parents.
gene_Case scenario in search of my Paternal Great Grand Parents.

…so today with a gentle nudge from my Grandfather “STUFF”, I contacted select cousins and all of his children my Mom, Uncle and Aunts to share the message to physically honor their Father, my Grandfather as it is the light he deserves. And I thank those who responded, for the alignment needed with fervor to keep #workingdalines.

For today Daddy Stuff, I’ve picked back up your paternal line as it is now added to my research docket today. #AncestorsSpeak #workingmylines

…Whose do you belong to?!

iba'e_A.Calloway2013
In observation and reverence of my Father’s transition, this Ancestral Season of Anba Dlo

Oct. 8, 2013, California — This walk of my life strongly reflects an aspect parallel to my Father’s journey, post fatherhood.  Before I knew him as my Father, I learned that he was born in Summerfield, LA, the youngest of 4, migrated to California at a young age with his Mother and Father, who later separated. In high school, he met my Mother on rebound and patiently courted, charming her into dating and eventually on “their 1st time” — then there was me. I learned that my birth was filled with the trials of a young Mother, classically partnered with a man facing the daunting responsibility of Fatherhood, both determined to “do the right thing.” And thus, the two were married 2 months before my birth. They loved, learned, struggled, and endured trials and triumphs to the tumultuous. Summerfield,LABoth were Louisiana reared in a traditional custom of staunch Family support by Grands and Greats to Uncles and Aunties.  My childhood was school everyday to church all Sunday; planting peas, making preserves to sewing and starching a shirt; running track to running the household chores; Friday fish fry to Family Reunions; from Black Power to Vietnam; cake walks, frog legs and “roaches” the kind that walked and the kind that made you “talk funny”.   My parents eventually divorced when I was 5 years old. –Bless them

At 5, with broom and belt in tow, I became instant lil’ mama, as I begin sweeping the house warning my brothers to behave — accepting a high sense of responsibility becoming independent and self-sufficient by default.  Often times my Father would resurface in my life phantom-like to instill the “fear of God” in me, and remind me to never forget to take care of my younger brothers.  While my maternal Grandparents were like my second parents on loan, my paternal Grandmother was a brash, wig wearing’, God-fearing’, church-going, haughty high-cheeked Lady who did not take to repeating herself.  She still lives where I grew up and had remarried a good-natured man named Brown, he transitioned some years back.

Although well-versed in Family History on my maternal side, I’d always wonder  where my paternal grandparents came from and what was their story.  Although my Grandmother and Brown were very good to us, she was very protective about talking about the past and didn’t speak too favorably of my biological grandfather. It wasn’t until after a severe stroke that, my Father’s “road home” revealed a potential loss to gain access about this side of my Family history.  However, at that time, my priority was to make certain his transition would be in the best care, knowing that he was well loved.  These preparations availed him the most fortunate moment before his passing — a reunion to make peace with the only Family he created.  After 30 years, we’d convene by his bedside: my Mother, his only wife and his 3 adult children.

On October 8, 2009, about 4-something in the morning, my Father took leave in peace and in sweet ease, with his children lightly sleeping at his bedside.  We spearheaded his Home-going ceremony, which was attended by both sides of his Family, friends, Homelessness advocates and scores of cousins.  The most profound presence at the ceremony, was his grieving mother who was compelled to sing an impromptu hymn to a now captivated audience.  Her haunting message in the midst of the song “… the bell has rung children, playtime is over! Time to come on in.”  I was pleased to receive a letter from my paternal Uncle’s church in Houston, as his Sister the Evangelist delivered “The Word”.  One of the most heartfelt moments at the Home-going was a down-to-earth letter submitted by an older cousin read aloud by my younger Brother, before the church; It revealed a rare glimpse as to what Our Father really thought of us — in some cases unbeknownst to us.

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Pine St. “The Big Wash” Black Dot Artists, Inc / Congo SQ West – refreshment, atonement and renewal. W. Oakland – 2009

Of Heart and Home: In 2009, I also took leave, feeling somewhat displaced and needed to truly grieve as one of my cosmological poles had now fallen. During this period, in some ways like my Father, I submitted myself to a vulnerable path, accepting a vow of benevolence, and wanted to increase my action of faith, determined to shake the sediment of emotional transgressions inherited by Family ties.  With faith forward, I needed to strip and re-visit the depths of me and as a result my landscape changed swiftly…including home.  In the beginning, I found the most comfort in a friend’s car, couches, palettes, or sometimes a prepared room honoring my path.  Along the way, I cleansed, listened and mirrored testimonies a many, from West Oakland to Harlem, New Orleans and back.  Often reflecting and wondering if the works “took” – wondering, “ How is Daddy? or “Is he close? ” or sometimes thinking, “…maybe I don’t want to know.”

Picking back up “the lines” of my Family History from past research, I began honing my skills participating in a workshop in Harlem at the Schomberg Research for Research in Black Culture and the New York Public Main Library, conducted by the local Black Genealogy chapter Jean Sampson Scott AAGHS-NY chapter.  Upon first investigative attempt, not only did I come across a record of my Maternal great grandmother for the first time, later upon Ancestry.com census records, I’d quickly unravel at least 4 generations of patriarchal Calloways, whom I never met nor heard of except for my grandfather when I was two — I was completely stunned. Ever so critical, the code had been cracked. Since then, I have discovered scores of Calloways, centenarians even and enjoy a close relationship with my Father’s brother, my Uncle James.

CallowayLine1013
My Father’s passing was my catalyst in unearthing his Family line, revealing these names…2009

On this 4th Anniversary in observation and reverence of my Father’s transition, I infused the sparkling highlights of the ocean’s waves — I listen, petition and speak, marveling at the enormity of its breadth and depth where Souls dwell, pacts are made and Mami washes woes away in exchange for well wishes — T’ache’o.  I smile, because even at 5 years old, I knew my Father had to go and I mentally held space for him.  It’d be 4 years later after his death, that I’d recognize that my culminating trek today, somewhat remarked an aspect of my Father’s path (metaphorically speaking) who once said to me,  “…you know I just had to drop out of the system and deal with myself.”

www.cohsf.org
Alvin C. Calloway a mover/shaker advocate for Coalition on Homelessness, San Francisco, CA

I’d find out later that he was a “mover and shaker” of the Coalition on Homelessness advocating for housing, shelter, Street Sheet program and affordable SRO’s for people in need, and so much more. I remember 2 months before his final departure, he’d painstakingly share how he’d watch our evolution, the shame of not being present, his pride and regretting the time wasted to make it right.  As I witnessed this narrow opening of painful truth, he shared that we had made it upon our own merits and felt he could not take any credit for that, except that we were Calloways. He had always been proud that his offspring would be the crowning glory of his legacy on earth.

[smile] This re-tell for me used to be heart-wrenching to share. However, learning that the heart is a working vessel, I’d strive to become stronger in love, light and of sweet ascension – today regaining a stronger sense of home, with his Ancestral presence ever so strong, in truth testament. ~Thank you Daddy, Love, Gina…

********************

~The after-life dream~

Him: [retort]   Whose do you belong to?

Me: [bewildered] You Daddy

Him: Alright then… [storms out]